In the wake of the events on Wednesday October 22, I’ve found myself reeling with a form of disconnect from my Canadian Identity.  I have to say it, I’m honestly scared.

The Prime Minister tells me that I shouldn’t be afraid though.  “Canada will never be intimidated,” he triumphantly declared in his address to the nation.

He went on to tell us how strong we are as a nation, and it’s the rhetoric that we all seemingly needed to hear at such a critical time.  In what’s being perceived as the true nature of Canada’s resolve, each party leader has echoed the same sentiments.

They’re all telling us not to be afraid, and that Canada – together – is strong.

It seems that this will be this moment in our history that defines us.  It will be this moment that we set aside our differences and unite against our common enemy.
But why am I still afraid?

Is this fear an indication that the enemy is winning?  Surely we can’t overlook this “attack on our country, on our values, on our society, on us Canadians,” as Stephen Harper described it in his address. Surely we should presume the worst; that there are those in this world that hate us because of our Canadian freedoms.

You see, they hate you and I, it’s as simple as that. This fact became undeniably clear when a single individual marched to parliament and took the life of a man who defends our freedom.

It’s obvious that this individual is so much more than just a mentally ill person who has been neglected by the social structures of our country and has spent several stretches in jail due to drug possession charges.

He is so much more than a drug addict who spent the weeks prior to the shooting in a homeless shelter; unable to advance in life due to heroin addiction and the criminal record that came with it.

He is so much more than the person who was denied a passport to travel to his father’s home country of Libya. ISIS is there, right?

This individual was a recent convert to Islam, and is therefore a representative of the terrorism we fear so much.

This is vastly different than when the white male with the white name killed three RCMP officers in New Brunswick just months ago.

You see, all we have to do is look at this recent shooter’s different sounding name and we automatically know that this was an ideological attack on Canada from ISIS.

If only when we denied him of his passport, because we knew he was a troubled Muslim and therefore an ISIS combatant, we threw him back in jail instead.

If only there were laws that made us able to prevent such a heinous attack against Canada as a nation.

Well, fear no more my fellow Canadians.  We will not be intimidated.  Our Prime Minister made our new resolve abundantly clear in his address.

“This will lead us to strengthen our resolve and redouble our efforts, and those of our national security agencies, to take all necessary steps to identify and counter threats and keep Canada safe here at home.”

In lieu of the events, be thankful that the highly controversial Bill C-13 will pass through uncontested.  If you disagree with the bill at a time like this, well, you’re probably a terrorist.

Just like when the bill was originally tabled as Bill C-30 in 2011 and turned down in 2012; if you were against it, you were probably a child molester.

The bill in question, which has been slammed as absolute privacy invasion by almost everyone who has read it, will legally make it far easier for Canadian security agencies to spy on you.

But it’s for your safety, though, because Canada is under attack.  Just imagine if these initiatives had been put in place and we could have monitored the online undertakings of this homeless drug-addict.

Be thankful as well that we will soon see new legislation that will make it far easier to utilize this collected information against Canadian citizens.

Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney has already indicated to the CBC that the government intends to strengthen Canada’s security laws while focusing on preventative arrests.

This new legislation will most likely mimic Bill C-36; which was implemented in Canada post 9/11.

Bill C-36 allowed for the detainment of a suspected terrorist for up to one year without charge.  It also allowed the government to make a list of suspected terrorist groups without releasing the criteria of what constitutes a terrorist group.

Fortunately, the government also didn’t have to notify a ‘terrorist group’ they were on the list.  This should, coincidentally, serve well for any of those annoying social-activist groups.  They could be pegged as terrorists and arrested; this should keep them in line.

Don’t listen to Naomi Klein and her silly Shock Doctrine theories.  This is for your best interest and for the safety of your country against the terrorists.

Do not be afraid because – together – we will defeat this enemy.  Canada will not be intimidated by these terrorists.

You have to do your part though, and thankfully, many of you have.

First of all, you have to forget about that white guy who killed three RCMP officers just a few months ago.

Continue spreading the actual truth on your social media.  Continue with the fear-mongering, but don’t be afraid!

Continue informing everybody that Canada has been attacked by Islam.  Don’t listen to those leftists who claim you to be bigoted and racist. You’re just defending your country by writing things like ‘Go Home’ on mosques in Alberta.

Together, as a nation, we are resolved.  We will implement all the procedures necessary to fight this terror.

The enemy has attacked Canada, and Canada will defend. The enemy is terror and we will not be intimidated.

…So why am I still afraid?